The INSPIRE team is glad to announce that the French National Institute of Nuclear and Particle Physics (IN2P3) has joined the INSPIRE collaboration. IN2P3 is the sixth institute to contribute to this global effort at the service of the worldwide High-Energy Physics community, alongside CERN, DESY, Fermilab, IHEP and SLAC.

IN2P3 is one of the ten institutes of the French National Centre for Scientific Research (CNRS) and represents 20 laboratories in France, 1000 permanent researchers and 1500 supporting staff, as well as 600 postdocs and PhD students. IN2P3 has already participated in INSPIRE activities since 2016, through a bilateral collaboration agreement with CERN, and a formal accession as INSPIRE partner has now been signed.

For years IN2P3 has brought enthusiastic and substantial support to open science. IN2P3 librarians (“Democrite” network) have been among the very first to massively and systematically deposit publications on the French open archive HAL (Hyper Articles en Ligne). From now on, the Democrite team is directly curating publications relevant to IN2P3 on INSPIRE, and after validation, these are automatically pushed to HAL (by SWORD protocol). Thanks to the IN2P3 open science policy and promotion, the vast majority of these records in HAL already have a direct link to an open access version, and HAL will soon be able to automatically obtain, display and archive the PDF versions of these documents. Since 2016, already 10,000 records have been treated through this process, with an average of 4,000 records per year, where half of them have IN2P3 authors and the other half have at least one French author. Thus, IN2P3 voluntarily supports the whole French physics community.

The IN2P3 team of curators brings to INSPIRE its knowledge of French affiliations and direct support of requests from French authors. They participate in the author disambiguation and publication attribution effort for French authors and can manually add content relevant to IN2P3 to INSPIRE. The very high quality of metadata in INSPIRE also allows them to extract reliable and refined metrics for the Institute. In France, they maintain a network of IN2P3 researchers to promote best practices for international visibility of their works (arXiv use, ORCID, etc.) and liaise with the other CNRS and CEA institutes interested in their contributions.

This partnership shows well that direct connections between a major international scientific information system, such as INSPIRE, and national or institutional archives are increasingly possible, facilitated by the generalization of common international identifiers (affiliations, authors, etc.) and voluntary open science policies.

– Mathieu Grives
IN2P3

Following the release of the new INSPIRE beta literature search and author profiles, we are pleased to announce the release of the new INSPIRE beta jobs!

We have upgraded our job submission forms, and added new features that will make it smoother for users to review and edit their job postings!

Up until now, if users wanted to make a modification (update a deadline, description, contact email etc.), they had to send a ticket, and our curator would make the change. 

In the new system, INSPIRE beta jobs, we give more freedom to users when it comes to managing their job openings. Curators still need to approve a new job posting, but once the job is displayed, the submitter can edit the job posting, and see the changes directly online. All this is now possible because we’ve enabled users to login with their ORCID to submit and modify their job posting. Anyone can send a new job to INSPIRE, as long as they have an ORCID account. You can read more about ORCID and how to create an account here

We’ll be running INSPIRE beta jobs in parallel with our current job platform. During this time, we’d more than appreciate your feedback (email us at feedback@inspirehep.net)! By hearing from you, our users, we’ll know what to improve in order to meet your needs in the best way possible! After a few weeks of testing, the new INSPIRE beta jobs will replace the current INSPIRE jobs platform. 

Note: INSPIRE beta jobs is currently under testing; therefore it contains a selection of job postings and is not updated regularly. Any updates on INSPIRE beta jobs won’t be reflected on INSPIRE.

However, if you’re interested in proceeding with job submissions on the new INSPIRE, we hope the following instructions will be useful!

How to submit a new job posting?

Once you’ve logged in with your ORCID, you’ll be able to access the job submission form that allows you to provide information about the position you’d like to post.

To do so, click on the “Submit” button in the top right corner of our homepage, and then on “Job”:

(The job submission option will be added after testing.)

At the time of submission, a job’s status will be set to “pending” by default, until our team has reviewed and approved it. Approved jobs will appear on the list of job postings

How to update a job posting?

As described earlier, from now on, users who have created a job posting are able to modify it, and their changes will be immediately shown in INSPIRE beta jobs.

To do so, simply go to your job posting and click the “Edit” icon at the bottom left of your job posting: . From there, you’ll access the update form, where you can change any job detail you want to.

To apply changes, you need to scroll down and click the “Submit” button: . You’ll get a message that your submission was successfully submitted if all went well.

How to update a deadline?

Updating a deadline is now much simpler. On the new platform, you’ll be able to log in using your ORCID, and access the editing options directly via the job posting link you received at the time of approval. 

Go to your job posting and click the “Edit” icon at the bottom left:. From there, you’ll access the update form, where you can change the deadline:

Changing the date is easily done via calendar, instead of having to follow a specific date format.

So, we get:

Once done editing, scroll down to submit via the respective button: -> and any successful submission should get the following message:

Your job posting will be instantly updated to reflect the changes you’ve made!

In our case, this would be:

How to remove a job posting?

If you, for any reason, want to remove your job posting from INSPIRE, you can do this by accessing the update form via the icon, and then simply changing the status of your job posting to “closed”:

It will immediately be removed from the job list once you’ve confirmed it by clicking on the  button. You should receive the following:

If, on the other hand, you want to re-open the job, you will have to create a new job posting.

Of course, the INSPIRE team is there to help you with whatever you might need to manage your job announcements on our website. Contact us at feedback@inspirehep.net with all your questions and feedback!

The INSPIRE Team

We are excited to announce INSPIRE beta, a sneak peek into the future of INSPIRE!

Built on top of a modern and reliable software architecture, INSPIRE beta aims at bringing the best out of the existing INSPIRE features while introducing new ones.

The High Energy Physics community’s feedback has always been part of shaping and improving INSPIRE; by launching INSPIRE beta to the community we enable an even closer connection, which helps us to deliver a new and better INSPIRE platform based on user needs.

That’s why INSPIRE beta is running in parallel to INSPIRE, while we work on ensuring that it will fully satisfy the needs of the HEP community. For the time being, users need to login via ORCID in order to try out INSPIRE beta, but the final platform will be available to everyone without any login required, same as the current INSPIRE platform.

You will see a powerful search, new filters (facets), and a new look-and-feel of search results and author pages.

Feel free to dive in, try out INSPIRE beta and tell us what you like and what we should improve via this feedback form.

What’s new

Search

INSPIRE beta features the familiar SPIRES syntax operators, currently the most popular way of searching in INSPIRE. According to our usage data, 95% of user searches correspond to the 10 most popular SPIRES syntax operators, as illustrated here:

SPIRES syntax operators

This was a clear indication for us when deciding our search implementation priorities. In the future, we will review the implementation based on user feedback, but for now, the following SPIRES syntax operators are supported on INSPIRE beta:

Search by Use operators Example
Author name a, au, author, namea witten
Author BAI a, au, author, name a J.M.Maldacena.1
Title t, title, ti t A First Course in String Theory
Eprint eprint eprint 1605.03630
Exact author name ea, exactauthor, exact-author ea ellis, j
Document type
(type-code)
tc, type-code, type, ty For thesis: tc t
Date d,date, year d 2015+
Citation numbertopcite,topcit, citedtopcite 1000+
Collaboration cn, collaboration cn babar
Journal j, journal, coden, published_in j Nucl.Phys.,B164,171
Number of authors ac,author-count, authorcount ac 1->10
Report number r,reportnumber, report-num, report, rept, rn r ATLAS-CONF-2011-084  
Citations of a record refersto:recid refersto:recid:193978
Texkey texkey texkey Lutz:2003jw
DOI doi doi 10.1088/1475-7516/2013/05/009
Record id recid, control_number recid:193978

In addition, we are investigating new ways to search for information using free text. We are currently improving the search results so that users can search by typing any combination of author names, title, dates etc. For example:

Filtering

The new facets allow users to refine their search. You can search by date, author name, subject, arXiv category, experiment and document type. Additionally, following user requests, we added a new facet to filter out papers with more than 10 authors.  The facet works similarly to the author count SPIRES operator (ac 1->10).

Citation counts

Citations are a very core function of what we do; INSPIRE aggregates content from many sources with often updated references. Currently, INSPIRE has 4 different algorithms for calculating citations, which can lead to discrepancies. In INSPIRE beta we implemented a new algorithm to calculate stable and accurate citations. So what does that mean for you? As we are still fine tuning the algorithm, you might encounter small citation differences between the two systems.

What’s next

For more info on new features and known issues, please visit our help page.


The INSPIRE service is operated by a global consortium, including IHEP in Beijing , We strive to connect the global High-Energy Physics (HEP) community, indexing over 1.000.000 relevant publications and offering accurate author profiles with citation statistics. . To celebrate our global reach, and serve the diversity of our community, some of our blog posts relevant to the Chinese HEP community will also appear in Chinese on our pages.

Let us know what you think about this and check out INSPIRE-HEP blog and twitter for more news. Our Chinese colleagues can also check our China Weibo micro-blog

The INSPIRE Advisory Board counts eight experimental and theoretical physicists from participating laboratories and the community at large, plus the manager of INSPIRE’s sister service NASA Astrophysics Data System. The Board meets yearly, and the 2015 meeting took place at CERN on May 7. INSPIRE’s staff reviewed the team’s work during the previous year, and discussed with the Board the present challenges and the path ahead. The meeting of the Advisory Board is always a great opportunity for the INSPIRE team to reflect on last year’s achievements. After the meeting, we interviewed the chair of the advisory board, Michael E. Peskin, to hear his opinion on INSPIRE’s recent progress and its near future.

What is your impression of INSPIRE as an academic information service?

Michael E. Peskin. I have a long history with INSPIRE, I came to SLAC in 1982 and soon after that began interacting with the staff of the service. At that time it was the SPIRES information system, which I actually had used even before that. SPIRES first went online in the 1970s as a kind of terminal/command-line based service, where you hooked up on the internet, and put in some command-line statements that began with “q”, and out came a long list of bibliographic references. And this actually saved my life. In 1981. I was asked to give a review lecture at one of the big international conferences on composite models of quarks and leptons, a subject about which I knew very little. I put some queries into SPIRES, and out came reams of paper with 800 references, and I actually looked through most of them. Since then I have found it to be a very reliable service. It provides information on four high-energy physics areas (hep-th, hep-ph, hep-ex, hep-lat). It is as complete and correct as a bibliographic service can be. It is user-based so it is constantly being checked by all the users. It is multi-faceted, so it gives you direct keyword searching but also citation search. The citations are also used by people to construct stories about their careers. So that means that there is an incentive for people to very carefully check that all the links are correct and everything is provided. And actually citation searching is the most effective way of searching for any topic that you are not familiar with. The method is simple: you find a review paper, look at the papers that cite that review paper, and work your way back up the chain that presents itself. I have found this to be the most effective way of getting familiar with a scientific topic. But it requires that you have complete and detailed coverage of the field. INSPIRE has the level of coverage that is required.

What is your opinion about INSPIRE Labs?

M.P. There are some capabilities that I felt were much needed by INSPIRE. One of the strong motivations for the new framework of INSPIRE is the ability it gives for users to communicate back to the service. I think it is still true that, if you want to correct an error or add a reference, you fill a form or write an email, and then someone at INSPIRE has to parse that email, interpret it, and then take the correct action. This just wastes effort for everybody. The correct way to do this is to have a form submission that drives the user to enter information in the way that the database would like to receive it. Then it will be possible to act on user requests in just a few minutes. In that way we can build bibliographic entries, correct citations, give new citation links, and update the author pages and HEPNames data. I believe this is really the way the user input to the service really should work. And it is not only cool to provide such a service, but it is also a method that makes it much easier to maintain the integrity of the database with limited resources.

As part of INSPIRE Labs we are trying to test new features. What do you think should come next apart from the submission form?

M.P. The other part that really matters is the back end of the new framework. This gives the curators more effective tools to examine records. Eventually INSPIRE will incorporate machine learning to suggest changes in the records and, eventually, to fix things automatically. This also deserves a high priority. Besides that, everyone wants more effective searching.

How satisfied are you with INSPIRE’s operational improvements since the last 5 years?

M.P. Before the transition from SPIRES to INSPIRE, the old search engine had difficulty with the steadily increasing size and complexity of the database. Five years ago, the system was breaking down during periods of stress. Things have come a long way since then. You can still see some glitches but it is very rare that you see a serious problem.

And what about the content?

M.P. The content has increased, and this is amazing. A recent trend, aligned with the increased interest in our community in dark matter and dark energy, has been the expansion of the coverage of astrophysics. This is still an issue energetically discussed with the Advisory Board. Another trend has been the incorporation of informal public notes from the large collaborations, such as the CMS Physics Analysis Summaries. These often contain more information than the journal papers based on them and ought to be found in general INSPIRE searches. In any case, it is amazing how deep coverage of the different subjects have grown.

Which do you believe are the weakest areas of INSPIRE that should be improved?

M.P. I’ll give you two different answers: From the point of view of someone doing casual searching and trying to find a particular article or review, the size and coverage of the collection is very important. It is important to include the informal literature, as I have already noted. But, also, I use INSPIRE when I write evaluation letters for grant proposals or for appointments. I want to look everything a certain person has done,. People applying for positions or gants would like to have their personal records clear and easy to obtain. For that you need unique author identification, which is a big project. This is especially a problem for people from Asia. Recently I wrote an evaluation letter for a friend of mine born in China who has a very common last name. You cannot expect to simply put in his name and not get reams of garbage. INSPIRE gives authors the capability to claim papers and edit their profiles on their HEPnames page. He had not done that exercise, at least not recently. This led to his publications being mixed up with the publications of many other persons with that same name. The process of cleaning one’s personal record, and of identifying authors and citations has always been somewhat tedious. I hope that, with INSPIRE Labs and its new features, this problem will be reduced.

And, last question, in which direction do you see INSPIRE’s future heading towards?

M.P. I think the big question is, “Can we make machine learning algorithms sufficiently powerful that they can take over almost all of the burden from human curators?” The thing that makes INSPIRE so powerful right now, is that we start from arXiv, where authors type in the essential bibliographic information for their papers. But, still, people are human, and sometimes this information is ambiguous or incomplete, so we need to check it against other resources. Since this input is essentially imperfect, a lot of the effort must go into improving this stream of information so it can be used reliably by the academic community. There are not so many people that are willing to work as curators, but there is a lot of data in machine memory that with correct manipulation could revolutionize the way in which information is organized and managed. We are not there yet, in INSPIRE, Google, or any other service, but the situation continually improves.

INSPIRE has already brought a new way of accessing scientific resources. Today, journals are mainly used for historical data and publications. Papers from the 1980’s are still important, and they are accessed through journals. But a paper written in the past couple of years was probably issued as an eprint on arXiv. As an author, you don’t want to wait months for a journal to publish it, in order to make it public. As a reader, you want to find this in a literature search the day after it hits the internet.

But now we would like to go beyond the paper as a means of communication. I have already mentioned the fact that INSPIRE is now indexing public notes from large experimental collaborations that amplify the discussion in their papers. The next step is to provide numerical backup to these and other papers – digitizations of figures and even data sets on which the analysis is based. These data sets would not be the whole Petabyte data sets of the LHC experiments, but they could be considerably more than simple tables and lists of a few high-significance events. People who want to play with publicly released data will, more and more, be able to find it. If you write a paper based on a data set, you ought to cite the data. INSPIRE is now making it possible to index data sets directly, to provide citations for them, and to have links to the data sets appear in relevant searches.

These are two are the main directions in which INSPIRE should be reaching. High-energy physics is quite far in front of other fields when it comes to scientific information services. Being on the edge benefits us in our research, and I hope that we can stay in the front as this edge moves outward.

Personal names are neither unique nor permanent. You can write or transcribe them in different ways. You can get married and change your family name. You can even find colleagues in HEP with the same name, e.g. John Smith. What happens when the John Smith you are looking for writes a paper? How do you tell him apart from his namesakes and find his articles? And does that article written by J.C.Smith in 1993 on [Nuclear Physics Revolution], belong to your colleague John, or Jim C. from Stanford?  This is something INSPIRE has been working on for a long time. We introduced INSPIRE IDs to uniquely establish your identity in our HEPNames database and more recently Author Publication Profiles, such as J.Q.Physicist.1 to collect all your papers together. But this is only for HEP, what about the wider world? Publishers introduced their own identification systems, so you probably have noticed that you have ended up with many IDs that describe your academic publications and CVs. These disparate identifier systems suffer from only partial coverage of a researcher’s corpus and interoperability issues.ORCID to the rescue!

ORCID (Open Researcher and Contributor ID) is a non-profit organization supported by a global community of organizational members, including research organizations, publishers, funders, professional associations, and other stakeholders in the research ecosystem which  has developed a unique researcher identifier that distinguishes you from other researchers. ORCID ID can hold a record of all your research activities, variants of your name, affiliations, etc. You can also use it for manuscript submissions to most of the major publishers.

It helps you centralize your information and sign your work unambiguously, no matter how your personal details, affiliations or field of work change. It is also an invaluable tool to track impact and grant credit to authors. It is a single identifier that follows you throughout your career. Having an ORCID ID gives your professional circle the ability to see your publications and your work experience. To sum up, ORCID can provide you a detailed professional record, something that can be a very useful tool for researchers that want to keep their publications and research in the spotlight. Moreover, some of the biggest research libraries as INSPIRE are collaborating with ORCID, to offer one unique and widely accepted ID.

How does ORCID work?

To begin with, an ORCID ID is a unique 16-digit code (e.g.0000-0002-5769-7094), given to you upon the registration of your ORCID account. After registering you can manage all your information from your profile page. You can add as many details as you want and set the level of privacy you desire for the information you enter (public, limited, or private).

image00
Fig 1: ORCID profile page

What makes ORCID special is its ability to synchronize content with other platforms and services. That means that you spend less time (re)entering data and have more time available to conduct research. At this time, well-known services collaborating with ORCID are Scopus, Nature, APS, Faculty of 1000. In case you are wondering what your publication page would look like in ORCID let’s have a look at a typical example in Fig. 2. You can also see that this person has connected  his ORCID with ResearcherID and Scopus:

image01
Fig 2: ORCID publication page

If you are interested in creating your own ORCID, just click here.

INSPIRE has been working on some exciting new features! Publications are leading to their respective authors  but with help from ORCID, INSPIRE is going to be sure about the author’s identity and the procedure to claim your own publications will become easier.

Keep an eye on the INSPIRE-HEP blog and twitter for our next blog post, to better understand ORCID’s significance and use for INSPIRE and INSPIRE Labs!

 

 

As you might have read in our previous blog post, the new INSPIRE Labs website is the place where we will deploy and let you test new features.

Let us show you one of our new features: check out the Suggestion Forms on Labs!

Do you know about any publication (articles, proceedings, thesis) that is not on INSPIRE but could be an interesting addition? You can help us by letting us know about it via our new suggestion form. We will be happy to review it and include the content as soon as possible if it falls within our collection policy.

Suggest_forms

Fig 1: Submit publications automatically

To make it simple, we included an automatic import tool (Fig. 1). If you enter an arXiv number and/or a DOI to the form, INSPIRE Labs will automatically pre-fill as much publication information as possible.

You can also fill out or complete it manually (Fig. 2). Only a few fields are mandatory, but the more information you provide us, the more useful it would be for the readers. It is particularly important that the Author fields contain all the co-authors who wrote the publication, with each name in a separate input field, one on each line.

manual_form
Fig 2: Submit publications manually

All the suggestions received will be reviewed by our team manually, to verify the content and complete the information following INSPIRE standards. This procedure can take a few days. Once the submission is approved, you will receive a confirmation e-mail and it will appear automatically in INSPIRE as a temporary record that will probably get further curation afterwards. Moreover, please do not worry if some processes like reference extraction and indexing may take some time.

You can find more information about how to use our suggestion form in our Help page.

We hope that you will find this new feature useful. As always, we are waiting for your feedback. You can send us an e-mail or try out the new Send Feedback widget on the right side of every INSPIRE Labs page. Let us know what you think about our new forms!

Ever wanted to just cut and paste a reference from a paper in INSPIRE and find the corresponding paper? We have worked hard to try to make this possible. You have two ways to do it:

rawref1Note that you must put your search in quotations when using rawref. However, you can omit the year when searching this way, e.g. find rawref “JHEP 1202 068”. Correct spacing is also not necessary, thus rawref:”Phys. Rev. D 90 064027″ and rawref:”Phys.Rev. D90 064027″ will yield the same result.

Any journal name variant listed in INSPIRE will work with rawref. You can find these variants by searching for a journal name in the Journal section of INSPIRE. Click the name for the detailed record, and then click the link for “Show name variants”.

namevariantsJournal record for Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research

Rawref:”Nucl.Instrum.Meth. A584 (2008) 75″, rawref:”Nucl. Inst. and Meth. Phys. Res. A584 (2008) 75″, and rawref:”NIM A584 (2008) 75″ are all valid searches.

If you just paste a reference in the search bar without ‘find rawref’, INSPIRE-HEP will try to guess what paper you are looking for.

journalhintJHEP 1202 (2012) 068

 Please contact us at feedback@inspirehep.net if you have any comments or suggestions for improving INSPIRE.

Usually we add DOIs and update INSPIRE to reflect the fact that articles are published within a few weeks of publication. This information is taken from feeds INSPIRE receives from publishers. We try to find the corresponding preprint in a semi-automatic way and add the publication information. Sometimes this process is delayed or fails. If after waiting patiently for updates you do believe there is a failure in the process, please let us know, as other articles might be affected as well.

But did you know that the quickest way to add a DOI and journal publication information to preprints in INSPIRE is to update them in arXiv? While this may seem like an indirect method, authors have direct control over their papers on arXiv (via paper password) and can easily augment information there in an authenticated way. INSPIRE automatically receives these updates within just a day or two. This can be done at any time, and adding the publication information on arXiv does not result in a new version either in arXiv or in INSPIRE.

Once you’ve logged in at arXiv, click the Journal ref symbol beside the papers you’d like to update.

hocdoi1

This will take you to a page where you can enter the relevant information.

tmp_axiv_2

More information on how to do this can be found at the arXiv help page on the topic.

Doing this on arXiv has several advantages. Information updated on arXiv will flow to other services as well, whereas information added to INSPIRE currently doesn’t propagate yet. While arXiv can process such requests automatically due to the login, it requires manual intervention at INSPIRE and hence it may take more time for the updates to appear. If you have any comments or questions on this topic, drop us a line at feedback@inspirehep.net.

As mentioned before, we have started re-designing INSPIRE and your feedback is proving to be precious! Our colleague Robin Colignon will share his thoughts about the importance of usability and how we are using it to improve INSPIRE.

Why is usability important?

If a website is too hard to understand, difficult to use, or the information is not arranged in a logical manner, most of the users feel frustrated and eventually leave and never come back.

Usability concepts cover both the ease of use and learnability of any human-made object, such as a website. Considering usability allows developers and designers to create easy-to-understand interfaces, provide well-organized information, and increase the users’ effectiveness, efficiency, and satisfaction.

If you have questions concerning usability, the following website will provide you further information: http://www.usability.gov.

INSPIRE’s new home page

Information architecture tackles the structural design of shared information environments to support findability and usability. Thus, the new information achitecture for INSPIRE focuses on the core functionalities and the content provided.

But before re-designing it we have to understand which ones are the most valuable features for our users; the best way to obtain such information is to ask the community directly.

We ran card sorting tests with our volunteer users, where they could organize the current content of INSPIRE as they thought they should be categorized, highlighted, or excluded. Every tester could group the cards according to their own preferences and provide new names and descriptions.

 

img003

 

These insights enlightened us and helped us create a first design interface that takes your needs and requests into account.

Have a look at our first proposal. The mock-up shows how the home page could look like:

image00

This is just a small teaser! We will be running lots of user tests during our re-design. If you are interested, come back in a few weeks to discover more or join us as a tester. We will be happy to share this experience with you! Contact us at
usability-testing@inspirehep.net.

Robin Colignon is an expert in UX/UI working on the re-design of INSPIRE. He graduated in Information System and Services Science and in Computer Science from the Université de Genève. His interests include user-centered design and interfaces.