Spotted incorrect or missing references on INSPIRE? Now it is easier for you to let us know about such things as we simplified our reference correction form.

Here’s how it works: Once you check the references of a paper, the tab offers you an “Update these references link” to update and correct them as needed.

 

Then you have three options. 

  • If there is a revised arXiv version with an updated reference list, you simply need to click this option and submit.
  • If the published version has an updated reference list, in the second step please paste the reference list.
  • If there are some references that have not been correctly identified, please provide detailed corrections in the second step.

In case there are no references added so far, you can just paste the whole reference list in an empty text field.

We’d also appreciate it if you would add a link to a pdf version of the paper. This will make identifying the references much easier and, thus, also much faster. For the first option this is not necessary.

If you have any issues or suggestions about the form, please email us at help@inspirehep.net.

INSPIRE has always relied on your feedback to understand what is significant to you.

In 2013 several hundred INSPIRE users replied to a feedback survey. We learnt a lot on what you find important and what you wish was better. We have already improved things based on your suggestions.

We are now looking for volunteers to test some of the next features on INSPIRE.

Recently we started conducting such usability testing sessions as we want to involve you more in the development.

At this time we are working on face-to-face testing. If you are based at CERN, and are willing to take a moment to contribute, we would be more than happy to hear from you at usability-testing@inspirehep.net

If you are based elsewhere – we will be soon conducting online testing sessions, too. Let us know if you would like to take part: usability-testing@inspirehep.net

Spend your coffee break with us to improve INSPIRE!

 

We are pleased to announce the 2013 edition of the Topcites lists.

It comes as no surprise that the Higgs discovery papers sit atop the list of topcited articles in 2013. They appear right after the Review of Particle Properties, of course, which has almost twice as many citations. The descriptions of the ATLAS and CMS detectors follow later in the list. Overall it has been an exciting time in experimental physics these past couple of  years; 7 hep-ex papers, 5 from 2012 and 2 from 2011 appear. In addition to the Higgs papers there are 4 neutrino papers and the Heavy Flavor Averaging Group’s report. Keeping with this trend, the list also includes 6 papers on observational  cosmology and one on the search for dark matter.

On the theoretical side the influence of experiment is strongly felt. The 10 topcited hep-ph papers are largely focused on data analysis and simulation. Along with theses goes the original Randall-Sundrum paper on extra dimensions which has been cited by over 300 CERN and Fermilab experimental papers in its lifetime.

In the world of formal theory, 4 of the 5 hep-th papers are the now classic papers on the AdS/CFT correspondence, newly relevant to heavy ion collisions, and the fifth is a review on dark energy.

The recent discovery at CERN makes the 1964 papers of Higgs, Englert and Brout, which won their authors the Nobel Prize for 2013, appear for the second year in a row. The other papers from before the eprint era cover cosmology, black-hole radiation and neutrino mass (including Minkowski’s sleeping beauty).

Blogs and Twitter feeds are an increasingly important means of communication for the HEP community. Whether it is the casual thoughts and observations of an individual or the official communications of an experimental collaboration, these modern avenues provide a nice background briefing to help us make sense of the official literature and keep up with the latest developments we may otherwise miss.

Following suggestions from some of you, INSPIRE recognizes the importance of this and we’ve begun to add this information to our records. See HEPNames for a list of links to tweets and blogs from the community, EXPERIMENTS for the Twitter feeds of the collaborations and INSTITUTIONS to keep up with news from your favorite HEP labs. You’ll find these links on the Orange Boxes on the right hand side of INSPIRE.

Do you know of any we’re missing? Contact us at feedback@inspirehep.net.

tmp_ob_exp

Recently in consultation with our Advisory Board we changed how we select astro-ph articles from arXiv, to optimize collection of the content our community needs.

Since then we have been analysing the results of the new selection process and listening to your feedback. As a result, we are making an important adjustment to the selection policy to better suit your needs.

As of the past Friday, we are again harvesting 100% of astro-ph.CO content. This eliminates the possibility of missing relevant papers. We will soon fill in any cosmology content that was not added to INSPIRE in the past few weeks. We are working to provide the most accurate and comprehensive citation data, so no articles and citations are lost.

INSPIRE will now add content from a subset of astro-ph that is relevant to our community:

  • astro-ph.HE in its entirety
  • astro-ph.CO in its entirety
  • All pre-prints which are cross-listed to astro-ph.HE and astro-ph.CO, as well as astro-ph preprints from other sub-categories which are cross-listed to any of the core INSPIRE categories.
  • As always the case, articles relevant to HEP will be added on a case-by-case basis.

Astro-ph authors should also be aware that because INSPIRE’s focus is HEP, our automated tools are slightly less effective at correctly attributing astro-ph articles to their authors, and extracting all the references.

Consequently, we would like to call on astro-ph authors to ‘claim’ these articles in their profiles (check here) and submit corrections via the reference correction form if any references need improvement.

As always, we will keep an eye on the results, and make sure we are making optimal use of our resources to provide the best service possible for our user community.

We apologize for any confusion or concern during the pilot phase and we are most grateful to the community in supporting the way we adjust our services. We are eager to receive your feedback as we work together to make INSPIRE always better.

The INSPIRE Management Team

We prepared for a major infrastructure update and roll-out of software improvements. We try to make the switch as seamless as possible. Thus, tomorrow Wednesday 23rd October, from 9 am – 5 pm CEST, INSPIRE will be upgraded. Searching will not be affected. However, other services will not be available during the update. These include job postings, conference submissions and all activities related to the author profile pages.

After this INSPIRE will be back to full and even better service including e.g. new author pages (watch for an upcoming blog post).

Our apologies for the inconvenience this may cause!

The 2013 Nobel Prize in physics was awarded to two particle physics theorists – François Englert and Peter W. Higgs today “for the theoretical discovery of a mechanism that contributes to our understanding of the origin of mass of subatomic particles, and which recently was confirmed through the discovery of the predicted fundamental particle, by the ATLAS and CMS experiments at CERN’s Large Hadron Collider.”

The theorists published their papers independently in 1964 – the first one by François Englert and Robert Brout, and, a month later, a pair of papers by Peter Higgs.

In the graph below you can see the number of citations that each of the papers received yearly since 1964 when they were published, peaking in 2012 with the latest Higgs boson search results.

Higgs-Nobel-plot-revised-final
Click to enlarge the picture

The theories were confirmed on 4th July 2012, by ATLAS and CMS, the two experiments at the LHC that were searching for the new particle. The two collaborations include more than 3000 people each.

The two papers published shortly after the first evidence presented by the experiments, accumulated enormous numbers of citations in just one year.

About a month ago the ATLAS experiment made the datasets behind the likelihood function associated to the Higgs boson property measurements available to the public in digital format. The datasets can be easily accessed on INSPIRE.

More about the Nobel prize in today’s CERN press release.

[A guest post from our power user and advisory board member Kyle Cranmer]

We are familiar with the critical role of INSPIRE in searching for papers, following references, tracking citations, and providing author profiles. Now INSPIRE is taking steps to extend this service to data, thus creating a rich new layer to the information system of high energy physics.

Historically, papers have been the primary means for scientific communication; however, it is common to augment papers with data. The Durham HepData project has hosted this type of data for several years, and since last year, HepData is integrated with INSPIRE. Some papers have several datasets associated to it, so each dataset is given a unique, persistent Digital Object Identifier (DOI). Not only do these DOIs ensure that you can find the data, but they also provide a clear way to cite the data.

Let’s look at an example. Last month, ATLAS took an important step forward and released a digital form of the likelihood function associated to the Higgs boson property measurements. You can find these likelihood functions by clicking on the Data tab of the ATLAS paper. There are three datasets associated to this paper, and each has its own DOI. For instance, the H→γγ likelihood’s DOI is 10.7484/INSPIREHEP.DATA.A78C.HK44. If you click, the DOI will “resolve” to the INSPIRE record for this specific dataset (not the paper). From this record you can:

  • download the data from the “Files” tab
  • check which papers are citing this dataset from the “Citation” tab
  • follow the link to the original paper
  • export a properly formatted citation to the dataset itself

In addition to data coming from HepData, INSPIRE now supports data hosted in other third-party data repositories such as Figshare or The Dataverse Network. To test this out, I put some data from a phenomenological study of the CMSSM onto Dataverse — yes, theorists create data too! In this case, Dataverse issued the persistent identifier to our data since they take on the responsibility to store it. I sent the persistent identifier to INSPIRE and now it shows up in the data tab of our original paper. INSPIRE can now track citations to this data, which is hosted remotely. Nice!

The last example comes from a not-so-high-energy experiment I was involved in called APEX Jefferson Lab, which is searching for evidence of a 5th fundamental force of nature together with similar experiments such as DarkLight, HPS, and MAMI. Unlike the enormous LHC experiments, APEX had 66 collaborators that contributed to the test-run for this small, special-purpose experiment. The results of the test run were published in 2011, and this week the raw mass distribution from those 770,509 events collected by APEX was released directly on INSPIRE.

These three examples illustrate the diversity of data in HEP ranging from low-level experimental data, to theoretical predictions, to the results of statistical analysis. They also demonstrate the richness of the data layer and the need for a robust information system. Looking to the future, we can imagine an extended author profile that includes details on datasets analogous to what we are already have with papers.

The Astronomy, Astrophysics and HEP communities have long relied on arXiv, ADS and INSPIRE for their communication. ADS has been tailored to the needs of the Astronomy and Astrophysics communities, and INSPIRE emerges from the HEP community. All three communities use arXiv to distribute preprints.

INSPIRE currently lists all astro-ph preprints appearing in arXiv. However, most of them are not immediately relevant to the HEP community and we do not provide additional services such as author disambiguation, affiliations, reference curation, conference information, etc. for these preprints.

Starting on the 1st of October, INSPIRE will only add a relevant subset of astro-ph:

  1. astro-ph.HE [High Energy Astrophysical Phenomena] in its entirety, including cross-listings
  2. For the rest of astro-ph, as for all other arXiv subcategories outside the CORE categories (see http://inspirehep.net/info/hep/collection-policy), we will take eprints cross-listed to the CORE categories.
  3. We will also take care to cover articles on dark matter and dark energy, as well as articles by the Planck Collaboration. Other articles relevant to HEP will be added on a case-by-case basis. For example, in the astro-ph.CO category [Cosmology and Extragalactic Astrophysics], roughly 50% of the publications are HEP-related and will be added to INSPIRE.

We hope this will make it easier for users to find relevant content. Our friends at ADS will continue to be the natural port of call for those users who need a deeper analysis of Astronomy and Astrophysics content, and we are working behind the scenes to better integrate the services of our two systems.

Dear INSPIRE users,

There is another part of INSPIRE tips that can help you use the system quicker and better. We wanted to remind you about some of the latest improvements we have implemented.

  • If you for example search for: f a ivanov, i and j yafia and d > 2000 and then select the citesummary option from the drop-down menu, the citations summary table for that particular set of results appears. At the bottom of the citation summary page, there is an option to exclude self-citations. Clicking one of the counts on the citation summary page shows you the individual articles that comprise that count.
  • We would like to remind you that we have recently completed an improvement on the topcites feature. INSPIRE considers a paper top-cited, if it is cited more than 50 times. Now the results are marked with different-coloured little flags in the result list according to how often a paper is cited.
  • We are happy to tell you that the job matrix is available now

For more search tips, check here.

Feel free to contact us at feedback@inspirehep.net if you still have any questions.